News Archives

Bespoke Frame Finishes - A New Look

Product v Technique

At the Christmas Bazaar, we demonstrated some new ideas and techniques for adding a more creative look to picture frames. In fact this was an insight into the thinking behind a re-launch of our Frame Finishes course. All of the courses we run tend to be project based, specifically designed to develop skills and techniques involved in a particular area. Up until now the Frame Finishes course was much more about products and how they can be used to develop particular finishes. Whilst that has worked quite well, it does mean that the ideas about techniques and skills used to create different looks have not really been explored.

The new look course will end that. There are 4 elements in the day which will be worked on through the day. There are 3 mini-projects, running concurrently, that look at ways of working with colour on natural wood:

  1. Applying a gesso base to provide a lighter look and more varied "patina" to a frame;
  2. Priming mouldings to create a base that can allow a whole range of paint effects to be applied;
  3. Working with natural mouldings directly, where the grain has an important part to play in the final finish

Decorative Frame finishes CourseThose projects allow you to try a good number of basic techniques as well as working directly with a wide and varied range of products:

  • PVA size
  • Gesso
  • Acrylic paints
  • Wood stains / dyes
  • Waxes (coloured / clear)
  • Varnish
  • Primer
  • Gilt creams / gilt varnish

The Complete Picture

The fourth project is a completed frame. If you have a piece of work ready mounted to the dimensions we provide in advance, you can tailor the colour palette to suit. As with our other courses, we will be getting you to follow the trainer's model. You will end up producing your own frame with specific finishes and highlights featured. This means we can take you through a series of practical skills and techniques, giving you a really strong foundation to get going on your own pieces.

Skills & techniques used in decorative finishesThe core skills are:

  • Priming the frame for paint finishes
  • Choosing a colour palette
  • Ragged paint effects
  • Sponged effects
  • Masking off areas
  • Picking out highlights (gilt cream / gilt varnish)
  • Adding a suitable "finish" to protect the frame

It will make for a busy yet incredibly informative day. It also means that instead of watching the trainer have all the fun, you have a chance to get your hands dirty too. By the end of the day you will have some test pieces to take away with you, as well as a beautifully finished complete frame.

The first of these new style courses will run at Beaconsfield in May 2009. Judging by the interest generated at the Christmas Bazaar, places are likely to be at a premium, so it is worth booking a place early on.

For more information click: Frame Finishes

Posted on: 29-Dec-2008@11:05:01, updated on: 29-Dec-2008@11:05:01.

 

Downloadable Moulding Catalogue

A brand new addition to the website is our mouldings catalogue. For each of the moulding types we have created a simple, downloadable file (PDF) so that you can see dimensions etc for each one*. To access these files, go to the mouldings page and select the "buy by the length" option for a particular moulding style. You will find a link at the end of the moulding description that opens the file in a new window.

free, downloadable catalogue of our full moulding range

You will also find all of the downloadable files for the full range of moulding styles listed in the right hand column on the general, mouldings pages of the site.

* Please remember the illustrations are a guide to colour, proportions etc and have not been produced to scale.

Posted on: 29-Dec-2008@09:42:54, updated on: 29-Dec-2008@09:42:54.

 

Master Classes Revealed

NEXT DATES SET FOR: 13th & 14th February 2010 - (click for details)

Richard Buttle, training developer for DIYframing & UK School of Framing, gives a personal view of the two master classes led by David Wilkie, prize winning, Guild Commended Framer.

 

High Point of the Year

Group working with David WilkieEvery year has its own special highlights. Sometimes it's a simple thing that is so satisfying, like introducing new kit into our basic training packages and see it really work. Others may be more obvious and dramatic, such as the amazing success of the new look website. On a personal level, developing the range of courses for DIYframing and UK School of Framing always gives me a great buzz. I also get the chance to work with so many people, in so many different parts of the country: that too has been especially satisfying this year. However, the true highlight of my year was having the chance to learn more about bespoke picture framing for myself and simply extend what I can do.

I have been framing for nearly 5 years, starting with my own photography, but rapidly developing a small but (happily) successful bespoke picture framing business on the Worcestershire / Warwickshire border. Most of my knowledge and skills have been developed through research, nosing around galleries and having to find solutions to the challenges presented by customers. This year, I had the rare chance to sit in on the two Mount Cutting & Decoration master classes. My self-appointed brief was to record what David Wilkie did and turn it into a set of notes to accompany future classes.

To work for me, 3 simple questions needed to be answered;

  1. Are the ideas practical and not too "self-indulgent";
  2. Could I have worked things out for myself?
  3. Are the ideas commercially and aesthetically viable?

Design, Inspired By Art

To say I was amazed would be an understatement. On the first count, I cannot believe the range of picture framing "special touches" David was prepared to share with us. He linked everything back to his ideas for the design, inspired from the artwork he was framing. Whether it was the choice of colour palette or particular type of spacing between boards, the success of everything depended on what it did for the look of the framed artwork. Whilst he would be the first to admit that entering competitions can be a more flamboyant end of his framing, David also demonstrated how he has drawn on his repertoire of skills when working for individuals and commercial organisations alike. So, we found out how to colour bevel edges on mount boards, colour mount board surfaces, create colour inserts and inlays as well as learning about a whole new range of mount cutting skills. Plus, we got to find out the sort of products he uses in a lot of his processes - none of them cost a fortune and you would be genuinely be surprised by some!

 

Close up of competition piece: Star Wars

Eureka Moments

I have tried putting colour lines and fills on mounts, but have always balked at the skills involved. Reading up on it and trying several different methods myself, I had relegated that particular effect to the most patient and saintly individuals to undertake. After 10 minutes explanation from David, it all made sense. Strangely, very little of what he demonstrated and explained had featured in any of the research and reading I had undertaken. Like so many of the ideas David talked about, he would get so far and then say: "I think it would probably be easier to do a quick demonstration." The range of practical ideas I picked up was amazing - many of them answering my favourite question, "How do they do that?" We kept getting the feeling you have when first learning how to cut double mounts properly: "Doh!" to quote Homer Simpson. What surprised me was how frequently that happened, especially as half of the group on the training had been in the framing business for some time. The simple pointers were just as fascinating, like how to part-peel off the backing of ATG tape to fine tune a position, before sticking board down permanently.

 

Portfolio of previous framing projects

Business Works

Finally, the most important test for me was how well these ideas could work commercially. David highlighted a way he works with some customers: it is a bit more of a design and commission package, where he agrees a budget before starting. That may not be how some of us can start out, but he did explore the notion of "up-selling". The idea of making people aware of what you can offer them is important and David backs that up with a folder containing examples of mount styles for customers to browse through, as well as an illustrated catalogue / file of types of framing projects he has completed. Another intriguing idea is to add some features in his framing to take it to a higher level. While he is not paid directly for it, he accounts for the expenditure as part of his marketing budget. Returning customers are then much more switched on about how he can work on their next piece of framing. So in a competitive market, being able and willing to offer a unique service clearly makes sense.

Register an interest in the next round of master classes.In just two days I really increased the repertoire of picture framing skills and ideas I can draw upon. I also learnt a massive amount about ways of using materials and kit to their full potential along with some great ideas for working with customers. The atmosphere of each day was exactly what a master class should be: a complete programme of planned ideas but with the tutor having the ability to tackle ideas generated by the group. This was all topped off with time for us to try things out practically with David giving support and guidance. As a result, there will be one or two rather special Christmas presents being sent this year.

If you want to make a difference to your picture framing, the simple fact is that these master classes are the best way to leap-frog what other framers are doing. The skills involved are well within the grasp of people used to doing their own framing, although the potential is really going to be developed by anybody selling their artwork or working within the framing industry.

Posted on: 04-Dec-2008@16:51:46, updated on: 04-Dec-2008@16:51:46.

 

Society of Wedding & Portrait Photographers

Society of Wedding & Portrait Photographers Convention.

Once again the SWPP & BPPA is holding its renowned convention in London this year. It has become the event for professional photographers, guaranteed to bring you into contact with some of the most important names in the business. There will be a vast range of exhibitors and real opportunities to pick up new ideas as well as the latest product lines.

Dates: Friday 16th January 2008, Saturday 17th January, Sunday 18th January

Venue: Novatel London West, 1 Shortlands
Hammersmith International Centre
LONDON
W6 8DR

This will be our fourth visit to the convention. We will have expert staff available to offer advice on how to develop framing as a very powerful extra to existing business portfolios. There will also be support for all levels of photographer, offering guidance on tools, equipment and materials, to create stunning presentations of your own work.

Whether photography is an interest, your profession or both, you shouldn't miss this show. We'll see you there.

For more detail about the show, click on this link: SWPP Convention website

Posted on: 04-Dec-2008@16:43:32, updated on: 04-Dec-2008@16:43:32.

 

Christmas Cracker


Open Day at DIYframing: 13th December

Christmas Bazaar

Our Christmas Open Day is just 1 month away.  Make a note in your diary to take a break from Christmas shopping crowds.  You might pick up some ideas to make framed Christmas presents just a little more special, pick up a bargain or just treat yourself to something new.

Saturday, December 13th at our base in Beaconsfield, 10.00 am - 2.30 pm


10% Discount on Tools

As a Christmas treat, we are offering all tools bought at the Open Day, with 10% discount on current, full web prices.

The showroom will be open, with the full new range of mouldings, kit and other materials to browse through. As well as the full product range available for purchase, there will be special reductions on a range of items (details to be released nearer to the event).

In addition we will be setting bargain prices on ex-demonstration tools and special offers on selected materials such as moulding packs.

Free Picture Framing Seminar: Colour finishes

Frame Finishes FREE

High points of these days are always the FREE seminars and demonstrations. This time we will be running two demonstrations with some great ideas for adding different types of finishes to natural wood mouldings.  These are an introduction to a NEW frame finishes course we will be running from late spring 2009.


Each presentation will last about 30 minutes, with time set aside for questions after. In order to take advantage of these seminars, you will need to book seats in advance. Places will be limited to 20 seats per session.

Demonstration 1: Light & Colour in paint effects (11.00 am - 11.40 am) - the effect of using a gesso base to allow colour wash effects on frames.

Free Picture Framing Seminar: Sponged Effects

Demonstraion 2: Sponged & Ragged Effects  (12.30 pm - 1.10 pm)- using two simple techniques to create a unique look to natural mouldings

To book your place on either, or both presentations contact:


judy@diyframing.com or free phone 0800 801061

DIYframing staff will all be on hand to demonstrate our framing tools, from hobby kit to the full, professional workshop.

There will also be information about the UK School of Framing with opportunities to discuss and find more out about the full training programme available, venues and costs.

We look forward to seeing you here.

 

 Christmas Open Day 13th December 10.00 am - 2.30 pm

 

 

 

 

Posted on: 07-Nov-2008@11:34:08, updated on: 07-Nov-2008@11:34:08.

 

Job Vacancy

Job Vacancy in Sunflower Gallery, MarlowFull time Gallery Assistant Sunflower Framing Marlow.

Our new Marlow store requires a mature, motivated and reliable full time assistant - must be able to work every weekend plus three days during each week by mutual agreement. You will be part of an excellent team offering the best framing service around.

Must be:

  • artistic
  • enthusiastic
  • energetic
  • practical with good people skills

Full training will be given. Opportunities to progress for the right applicant

Pay £8.00 per hour plus holidays


If you are interested in the position please use contacts listed for details and/or application form:

Judy Robertson (General Manager) DIYframing Ltd, Woodlands Studio, Woodlands Farm, Burnham Road, Beaconsfield, Bucks HP9 2SF

T. 01494 670411

E. judy@diyframing.com

Posted on: 22-Oct-2008@06:22:22, updated on: 22-Oct-2008@06:22:22.

 

Make It Yours, Make It Local

Spotting Your Customers

I've hinted at it in all the previous articles about developing a picture framing business, but just to clarify: it is essential to keep taking stock of how you are doing. Having a really good (and honest) look at what is working well, what needs improving and what needs a complete overhaul will keep your business fresh.

Many things will evolve in your business as you become more confident with what you are doing. One thing, however, that seems to remain the same is the customer profile. I have done this a number of times with my own galleries: when you analyse the demographic of your customers, you will probably discover that the majority is within a 5 mile radius of your shop / workshop. In more rural areas it might be a bit wider, say 10 miles. But the clear fact is that the main income is generated locally.

Working with the local community: helping the nuresry PTAIt is also important to recognise that, if operating from any form of commercial property, picture framing is seen as a "destination" market. In other words, customers come specifically with something in mind for framing: they will often have it with them. Impulse buying is less likely unless you sell prints or photography, for example, where buying the artwork might trigger the idea of having it framed.

So what are the implications for you?

  • First of all, understand that local success is vital.
  • Secondly, by increasing your local profile you will increase business.
  • Finally, make sure you identify all of the local possibilities.

Posted on: 20-Oct-2008@12:42:31, updated on: 20-Oct-2008@12:42:31.

 

Expert Advice on Show

Diyframing regularly visits shows and exhibitions.

The first time we meet new customers can be at the various trade shows. On our first visit it can be a bit of surprise for you to find companies promoting picture framing among the many crafts and supplies stands.

Subsequent visits mean that customers can plan to check out our stand- people often tell us the only reason they come to a show is because we are there. Of course it's not purely because of our personal, social magnetism; there are often special offers and highly competitive pricing on the stock we have with us. More importantly, it offers the chance to see demonstrations of kit and simple framing & mount cutting techniques. In fact, very few other companies can, not only talk you through the framing process, but can also demonstrate each skill and step.

Especially for those of you who can't make it to Beaconsfield, the shows can be a bit like an Open Day, but nearer to your home.

The next two shows we will be attending are:
Creative Stitches & Hobbycrafts - Exeter (Westpoint Showground STAND C30): 25th - 28th September
Knitting & Stitching Show - London (Alexander Palace): 9th - 12th October

So, don't be put off if the whole show doesn't appeal, come and have a chat with DIYframing and see what you can pick up.

Posted on: 16-Sep-2008@08:54:31, updated on: 16-Sep-2008@08:54:31.

 

Great News

Picture framing training dates in Scotland

Great news! DIYframing is back in Scotland and this time we will be training in three different locations (click dates for details):

Each of the weekends features a complete package to take anybody working with 2D artforms (including needlecraft) from being a complete novice to feeling confident with picture framing.

You can also book the two days separately:

Featured as art & photography framing weekends the two training days have given a number of students the confidence they needed to take their artwork even further. Some have started to exhibit and sell their artwork as the finished article; the added "perceived value" that framing brings to pictures is amazing. Others have gone on to develop part time & full time business in which picture framing takes a full part.

Have a browse through some of the features written about some of our past students case studies

Most importantly, everybody joining our training days gets a real buzz from their own achievements and for many it is just the spur needed to work through the backlog of pictures they want to put up at home.

Book early to avoid disappointment.

Posted on: 16-Sep-2008@08:44:00, updated on: 16-Sep-2008@08:44:00.

 

The Art of Fine Framing

Complex pieces, Simple Techniques

David Wilkie at Open DayDavid Wilkie really inspired visitors to the DIYframing Open Day on Saturday 13th September. His two presentations gave a true insight into the fine art of picture framing, the care and thought involved in the very best work. He brought along a variety of his framed pieces showing the range and depth of his skills: from very simple, minimal looks to a more sculptural, almost architectural, style. It wasn't just the award winning mounts that caught our imaginations; it was how well the framing captured and reflected elements within the content, colour palette and design of the artwork itself.

Complex look but simple tecniquesAlthough David took time to explain how ideas came together, even the more complex pieces used some simple techniques. It is always possible that difficult routines appear easy, managed in expert hands, but from the responses of the packed training room, it was clear that people were inspired to try things for themselves.

So many ideas, explanations and "framing" knowledge were outlined by David in the two, 50 minute sessions. Many stayed on afterwards to ask questions and to look at his exhibition of picture framing. Obviously the sessions struck a real seam of interest among the artists, photographers and framers in the audience. For those wishing to find out even more, or to try things for themselves, the next stop has to be David's two master classes running in November.

Find out more about each of the sessions:

To avoid disappointment with bookings, please make sure you have reserved places on each class by 21st October.

Posted on: 16-Sep-2008@08:12:07, updated on: 16-Sep-2008@08:12:07.

 

Taking Business Further - Ensuring Success

Progress Your Business

The Three PsKeep moulding samples displays simple, clear and tidy.

Successful businesses are not static. They respond to the market place, customers, developments and innovations within the broader sphere of an industry. A picture framing business is no different - complacency can so easily cause a downward spiral.

I have been directly involved in the picture framing business for many years. I've worked from home, run my own gallery and am now opening more framing outlets. I have always developed these businesses around the three "Ps":

  1. Presentation
  2. Professionalism
  3. Profits

Presentation ... be your own best (harshest) critic

In picture framing, people expect us to be creative, artistic and have an eye for presentation. I have recently been exploring businesses for sale, looking to open up another couple of galleries. Walking into one workshop, I was amazed at what I saw. First thoughts were where is the counter? More importantly where is the staff? Squeezing my way between tightly packed displays of pictures I spotted a door: still no sign of life. A bit like Tomb Raider, the door led into a corridor opening on to a work area with a small table at one end, piled high with moulding samples, a few magazines and a discarded apron. The walkways were cluttered with packaging stacked in shoulder high piles. No real space left to put your feet. Yet, this is where customers come to place orders. In the middle of it all was a lady, framing some cross stitching. One visitor did arrive whilst I was there: the framing was actually placed on the floor in order to deal with the customer.

This is no exaggeration. Seen through the customer's eyes, the cluttered space and treatment of artwork clearly would set alarm bells ringing. You would have minimal expectations and regret ever entering the place. Would you return?

Posted on: 15-Sep-2008@11:05:44, updated on: 15-Sep-2008@11:05:44.

 

Fundamentals of Starting Up a Professional Framing

3rd Article written for the PPFA

A major benefit of turning picture framing into a business is the apparently low, start-up cost. This is especially true if premises are not part of it. BUT don't let this give you the impression that it is something you can drift into. The key word in the title is "Professional". Keeping a handle on some simple principles will ensure your business works. It's a bit like entering a race.

 

"On your marks ..."

Starting your own picture framing business can work.

Don't take something on without planning or preparation. For example, galleries and shops, which "look just right", really need closer examination. Remember, you need to be earning from day 1, because you will pay rent from day 1. You also need to know that the business will earn money.

Whether you intend working from business premises, a rented workshop or home workshop, always find out about:

  • Competition - check local shops, galleries, yellow pages, local advertising and web searches. Are you working against successful, established businesses?
  • Actual competitors - visit shops, ask about their services. Can you offer something different or better to win custom over?
  • Potential customer base - gauge spending potential. Does the area suggest people spend on picture framing?
  • Potential business customers in the area - art shops; photographers; pubs; hotels; café / restaurants; smart offices. What do they want from a new picture framers / gallery;

If you intend to take on an existing business examine:

  • Reason for sale - if it's a good business, why sell?
  • Books and trade - is there a profit? Who uses the current service? Is there potential for improvement?
  • Premises - right look, but business is slow, how will you change that?
  • Potential links with local businesses.
  • See who visits the premises.

Finally be practical:

  • Are you up to operating a business - talk to others and find a "mentor" who has successfully done it,
  • Learn how to frame pictures - a range of UK School of Framing courses available
  • Research framing trends, fashions and techniques.
For more, click In Full icon below

 

Posted on: 12-Aug-2008@08:03:28, updated on: 12-Aug-2008@08:03:28.

 

Winners In Maidstone

Dot Penn: success on her prize winning day.

DIYframing recently ran a competition with Craft Focus Magazine to win a day's training with UK School of Framing. There were a number of winners and we talked to one of them when a group was training in Maidstone recently.

In amongst a pile of publications where she works, Dot Penn spotted the latest copy of Craft Focus Magazine. She noticed the piece about framing your own artwork, and read on, finally deciding to have a go at the competition.

"I dibble and dabble in all sorts of arts and crafts and I fancied having a go," explained Dot. "Right from the start I had a feeling that I was going to win."

The Basics of Framing training workshop she settled for will come in really useful. She has loads of pictures; some left to her by family as well as her own pieces. All are too good to get rid of. It has taken several years for her to organise it all, but she already has over 100 hanging. Most were framed by a contact in the business, although Dot has been buying up old frames from charity shops and a friend has been cutting them to size for her.

However, there are still many more pieces to work on. Dot loves doing things for herself and she is really excited about what her new skills will achieve. She now has her eye on the next project: re framing a number of her aunt's pictures. Doing her own framing will save money and help to extend her sewing hobby. She is also a cake decorator and can see a real challenge ahead. How do you frame hand coloured decorations such as flowers and plaques? DIYframing will have to do some research to help out.

Her training day was a great success. Dot really enjoyed its practical nature and the fact that you go home a beautifully framed picture. She feels much more confident about tackling her backlog of artwork. Friends, who saw the finished article, were really impressed; right down to the beautiful lime-wax finish. They thought that would take a course all of its own: in fact just 15 minutes. She's particularly pleased about learning how to cut glass and intends to practise on a few glass off-cuts, so that she is a real whizz with the cutter.

Dot loved the whole experience. "The course was brilliant and good fun. The others in the group were really interesting too. Now I'm just itching to get started. In fact it's my wedding anniversary today and my husband's buying me a mitre saw as an anniversary gift."

From what Dot has told us, it may just be the start of her shopping list.

Posted on: 12-Aug-2008@07:44:37, updated on: 12-Aug-2008@07:44:37.

 

Summer Open Day

It's amazing how quickly events come and go. In fact our free seminar in August was fully booked within just a few hours of publicising it. Therefore, we thought we would give you a bit of advanced warning about our Open Day:

Saturday, September 13th at our base in Beaconsfield, 10.00 am - 2.30 pm

Range of new mouldings on show in DIYframing shop.

The showroom will be open, with the full new range of mouldings, kit and other materials to browse through. As well as the full product range available for purchase, there will be special reductions on a range of items (details to be released nearer to the event). In addition we will be setting bargain prices on ex-demonstration tools and special offers on selected materials such as moulding packs.

High points of these days are always the FREE seminars and demonstrations. This year we have a guest presenter in David Wilkie. He is one of the UK's leading framers, having won several prizes for his beautifully designed and created pieces. He will be talking visitors through his design ideas and the techniques he used, as a preview of the two master classes he will be leading in October 2008.

Each presentation will last about 30 minutes, with time set aside for questions after. In order to take advantage of these seminars, you will need to book seats in advance. Places will be limited to 30 seats per session.

Free Picture Framing Seminars with David WilkiePresentation 1: Mounting Passion (11.00 am - 11.40 am)

- applying colours & finishes to a wide range of mount styles to give added value and dynamic, aesthetic qualities to framed artwork

 

Presentation 2: Finest Cuts  (12.30 pm - 1.10 pm)

- sculptural effects that imaginatively designed, cut and positioned mounts (and mount-board sections) can have on the impact of a piece of framing.

To book your place on either, or both presentations contact:

judy@diyframing.com or free phone 0800 801061

 

DIYframing staff will all be on hand to demonstrate our framing tools, from hobby kit to the full, professional workshop.

There will also be information about the UK School of Framing with opportunities to discuss and find more out about the full training programme available, venues and costs.

We look forward to seeing you here.

Posted on: 02-Aug-2008@08:17:46, updated on: 02-Aug-2008@08:17:46.

 

What Is A Pro Framer?

A Pro Framer Is ...

Trying to pin down the profile of a professional framer is really tricky: there just isn't a simple formula. It is clear, however, that certain factors create success whilst others have to be overcome. The best way to illustrate this is to give you some snap shots of how people work.

Work space of Home Based FramerHome based framer..... Professional

Many "pro-framers" will have started off at home, often choosing to have a go at framing their own artwork. Jan is the perfect example. Needing a creative outlet after leaving an earlier career in the theatre, she started painting as a hobby. In order to save money she tried framing her own pictures. Having learnt the tricks of the trade she started framing for friends and family. She re-invested her profits, bought professional kit, more training (helping her to pass her Commended Guild Framers exam) and converted her garage into a well insulated, brightly lit workshop. Living in a residential area, large deliveries are made to her workplace and then ferried home for storage.

Her current employer and associates were Jan's next customers, commissioning a whole range of bespoke framing. Away from personal contacts, however, marketing your service to the public is essential. Without commercial premises for people to visit this is challenging. Starting with hand flyers, posted locally, the business launch was quite low-key. Jan wanted to develop her framing skills, confidence and be sure she was able to give a top quality service, before shouting about it. Then she invested in her website.

Where this type of business excels is in the personal touch. Personal consultations and a door to door service are invaluable marketing tools. Bespoke picture framing jobs may take time, but that is where this business makes a profit. Once established, good reputations always bring in referral clients and follow up pieces.

Posted on: 21-Jul-2008@07:51:05, updated on: 21-Jul-2008@07:51:05.

 

Interview with Nigel McNaught of the PMA

Duncan McDonald Explores the UK School of Framing Training Program

Interview with the Professional Picture Framers AssociationAs the Professional Picture Framers Association starts to offer courses in the framing business and framing techniques to PMA members, Nigel McNaught spoke with Duncan McDonald, founder of the UK School of Framing, about how he got into the framing business.

Nigel McNaught, PMA

NMcN: How did you start?

DMcD: At first it was to save a bit of money. We had just bought our first house and needed some pictures on the wall so I took a pile of photos and prints to my local framer with £100 budget. After discussing the first small print the assistant said and that will be £60! I made my excuses and left stating that I would get one done every month.

Duncan McDonald, DIYframingI shot straight down to the DIY store bought a saw and mitre block, and some architrave and made my own. Well tried to. The gaps coupled with the green tinted greenhouse glass I used gave a... what shall I say "Rustic" appearance. I needed to be taught how to do this properly.

Where did you train to do it properly?

I looked all over to find a proper framing course and the only one I could find was an evening class in a local college. The tutor was a very nice guy but he was a woodworker not a framer. The tools to say the least were basic, we used a Stanley knife to cut the mounts! The weekly queue to use the tools infuriated me as there was a little old lady who always pushed in front of me and hogged the piece of equipment for what seemed like most of the evening. I quit after 3 visits.


However it didn't stop me and I eventually found a framer who took me under his wing and in turn for some help he showed me the ropes. After gaining confidence by doing a lot of framing for friends and family, I set up a home business working from my garage. This became such a success that it wasn't long before I purchased a failing framing business in Beaconsfield and started my framing empire in earnest. I turned things around in a very short time and now 10 years later it is a thriving business employing three framers and making a tidy profit.

Posted on: 21-Jul-2008@07:42:13, updated on: 21-Jul-2008@07:42:13.

 

Sponsoring the PBM 2009 Framing Competition

DIYframing sponsors 2009 Picture Business Competition

Duncan McDonald & Peter Hancocks shake on Picture Business Competion sponsorshipDuncan McDonald, CEO of DIYframing is delighted to be part of the Picture Business Magazine's 2009 Framing Competition. He recently agreed a sponsorship package for the competition with Picture Business editor Peter Hancocks.

"It's a great way for DIYframing and the UK School of Framing to show that we can address the needs of the complete novice framer as well as supporting the very top flight of framing design," explained Duncan

3 of the 5 images available for framingIconic 60s black and white images supplied by world-renowned photographer, Philip Townsend is the chosen subject matter for the Picture Business 2009 Framing Competition. Sponsored by leading mouldings supplier Arqadia, Picture Business is now able to reveal details of the exciting prints that will feature in this year's competition.

Framers can choose from one of five of the following black and white images from the decade of Peace and Love, namely

  • Harrison and Lennon with the Maharishi
  • Early Stones
  • Sixties Girl
  • The Bachelors
  • Twiggy

Picture Business editor, Peter Hancocks said: "It will be very interesting to see how framers tackle b/w images from so colourful a decade in history! Will they go for the accepted traditional aspect which more oft than not lends itself to b/w imagery or will they dare to introduce the dots, slashes and colour clashes of this coveted era of psychedelia?"

The competition is limited to 50 entrants in total and there are only ten images available of each iconic shot, therefore applicants would be wise to get their chosen request in as soon as possible as the prints will be issued on a first come, first served basis.

As in previous years, there will be a first prize of £1,000 for the winning entry, £500 for second place and £250 for that of third.

To enter the competition, all you have to do is email your name, address phone number and print of your choice to peter® lemapublishing.co.uk quoting 'Picture Business Framing Comp' in the subject field. If email is not your chosen mode of communication you can include the requested detail on a postcard and mail same to The Editor, Picture Business, Lema Publishing, 1, Churchgates, The Wilderness, Berkhamsted, Herts, HP4 2UB.

 


 

Posted on: 01-Jul-2008@13:42:33, updated on: 01-Jul-2008@13:44:14.

 

Basics of Framing with the OCA

Special framing course run with the open college of artsThis is a Basics of Framing course being run in conjunction with the Open College of Arts.  It will run on September 20th 2008 in Barnsley

For full details of the day or to book the course visit the OCA website by clicking: OCA Basics Day

Posted on: 11-Jun-2008@07:38:24, updated on: 19-Jun-2008@07:07:35.

 

Cutting Sensation

The Onyx 90 sheet materials cutter.

The Onyx 90 is the revolutionary new media cutter from the USA.

This amazing new anodized aluminum and stainless steel cutter cuts and sizes mount board, foam board, glass, plastic and more.

DIYframing's CEO Duncan McDonald who sourced the cutter during a trip to the West Coast Art & Frame Show in Las Vegas says, " We have been looking to supply a really good quality cutter at the right price for a long time and this one definitely fits the bill"

With 3 interchangeable heads that are the easiest to change in the industry, changing from one board type to another is now so much easier.

The 60" vertical cutter will handle media up to 16mm (5/8") thick, it has a built in clamp and calibrated production stops in both inches and millimeters. It also comes with many extra blades and cutting wheels. Additional extras include a five legged collapsible stand which will allow use of the cutter without it being attached to a wall.


Duncan says, "I am convinced this superb tool will be a success as it ticks all the boxes for quality, cost and flexibility."

The Onyx 90 has been engineered to last a lifetime and comes with a 5 year warranty, Diyframing is supporting the cutter in the UK offering spare parts, blades and servicing.

Posted on: 16-Jun-2008@09:50:20, updated on: 16-Jun-2008@09:50:20.

 

Framing Sports Shirts

Planning the framing projectSpecialist Training Day - The First of Many

Planning the framing project takes time and care.Part of the problem was the scale of the final piece. Not all sports personalities are the size of rugby players, but, by the time you have allowed for most of the jersey to be shown with a decorative backing, the frame will still be around 600 mm x 750 mm - bit bigger than A4. So setting the tables in the training room for 9 of us to work at, each with 3m lengths of moulding, took some planning and ingenuity. And a quick reorganisation part way through the day. In the end it was a bit like Strictly Come Framing with the synchronised moves needed, but we all managed to produce good quality frames.

The major difference between what we were doing and 2D framing is the internal depth. Keeping the shirt well supported and away from the glass is quite a challenge. The solution we came up with was to create a spacer frame sitting between the mount and the back board. It does mean taking time to wrestle with a second load of moulding, but is well worth the effort, as it provides added internal strength. It also makes the final assemble relatively easy.

Sports jerseys are sewn into place.Whenever you frame a piece of clothing it will need an interior support panel. They are quite easy to create and prevent sagging between the various attachment points. The shape needs careful planning so that it doesn't over stretch the garment or push corners through the material. There are several methods for attaching shirts and support panel onto a backing: specialised tab guns; hanger systems; sewing in - some have even been known to use staples (definitely not advised by DIYframing).

The jerseys are supported and sewn on to a backing board.Sewing was the option used, mainly because this requires more skill and looks the best. Oh how we enjoyed ourselves for the next 45 minutes! You could have heard a pin drop (in fact several did) the concentration was so great! The real skill is hiding the stitches, as far as possible, by going through seams or under folds. You also have to provide enough stretch to get rid of the wrinkles but not so much that it looks like a bad face-lift. Of course some shirt fabrics are so flimsy that you could actually double the size of the shirt with stretching.

How did they turn out?

Actually, very well indeed. You really do feel you have completed a bit of top quality framing and the shirts looked really impressive in their frames. How much would you charge for this type of work? Expect to pay anywhere upwards of £110.00 for the style of framing used on the day.

The finished frames looked fantastic.In all fairness, we should have called the day a frame a sports shirt day, because the project is quite demanding and really left no time over for more general chat. Having said that, memorabilia work is usually going to be framing garments, objects or a combination of both. Our regular 3D framing course covers most the principles behind framing objects that are displayed in a box. So this gave a chance to look at a different range of challenges.
The final framed sports shirts looked great.

Bob P (now a trading framer trained by DIYframing) had a go at this (Norwich City shirt, no less) and is always good barometer for how a session has gone, was delighted with the day. Afterwards he said,

"Done them all (courses), I expect you'll think of something else for me to come along to."

If you have any ideas for a specialist day you would like to try, please let us know. We can't let Bob down.

 

Posted on: 16-Jun-2008@09:33:36, updated on: 16-Jun-2008@09:33:36.

 

UK School of Framing @ DIYframing

U.K. School of FramingIn many ways the whole idea of teaching people how to do their own picture framing was a direct response to customer need:  "We've got the tools - now what do we do with them?"  It has always been the intention to make quality picture framing a hallmark of our courses, no matter how simple the kit being used.  Five years on, that core idea remains the same. However, the concept of showing people how to frame their own artwork has grown out of all proportion - way beyond just learning how to use the tools.

 

That is why we are launching the UK School of Framing under its own name.  It is all about establishing a clear identity.  So, DIYframing is where you go for tools, materials and framing resources: UK School of Framing is where you learn about picture framing.  It also reflects that change of emphasis.  The School can now take people from being a complete novice to preparing them for the Guild Commended Framer assessment. 

What does the UK School of Framing offer?  Here are some thoughts to get you started:

  • An easy to find base for learning about picture framing;
  • A suite of training modules planned to build, in increasing depth, skills and knowledge of picture framing; 
  • The flexibility for customers to build a programme of training from the 1 day modules, to suit individual interests and art backgrounds
  • The opportunity to work through these modules at the pace wanted;
  • Support of national and international professional art and framing groups;
  • News, articles and information sheets from the heart of the picture framing world
  • One-off specialist courses;

A new range of learning materials: training manuals, distance learning packages and library of framing projects (explained).

In short we can take people way past simply framing for themselves under the UK School of Framing banner (or UKSoF as it is affectionately known). You will also guess the reason for not sticking with our initial name - First UK School of Framing.  Make sure you find the link on the new website home page.

Posted on: 09-Jun-2008@14:22:58, updated on: 09-Jun-2008@14:35:19.

 

The Life of a Long Distance Framer

Alex reveals the joys of travelling the world with DIYframing.

For those of you who don't know (and it can't be many) I am charged with spreading the word of DIY Framing via trade and craft exhibitions; you could say I hold a missionary position. I also occasionally don my 'trainers' cap and, whip and chair in hand, venture forth to educate lucky people on the life changing experience that is picture framing.

What you won't know is that on these missions I am not in control of the choice of accommodation. Judy is the procurer of accommodation, with the strict brief that my comfort is second only to expense.

My recent 'comfort' has included a 15min walk to a hotel parking space in Glasgow, being able to wave at the pilots on approach to Manchester airport, a B&B in Newcastle which had an independent review headed 'worst hotel in the north', and most lavish of all the 3'6" x 15' room in Cambridge complete with used plate, knife and fork, gentleman's periodical (very used), fridge (?!), Barbie shower and toilet, Salvation Army bed and continental breakfast (from which continent I know not).

Now you have a small idea of my stays away you will understand my relief when ICHF announced a new show in Liverpool (my home town). Accommodation was not an issue I was to stay at the best place in town, Chez Mam. No concerns over en suite, clean bedding or towels, tv, full English, parking, cultural differences. I was to be spoilt in only ways a Mam can spoil.

The night before setting off I dutifully phoned my mother who wanted to know my exact time of arrival in order to 'have me tea on the table'. The conversation went as follows:

Me: Hello Mam, Just thought I'd give you a call about tomorrow.

Mam: (sheepishly) Something terrible's happened.

Me: (worried) 'Are you alright? Is everybody else alright?

Mam: Yes everyone's fine.

Me: So what's so bad then?

Mam: I left the tap running in the bathroom.

Me: ..... .how bad is it?

Mam: It could have been worse.

Me: How bad, Mam?

Mam: The bathroom, dining room ceiling, table, dining room carpet, living room carpet, kitchen floor and some of the electrics. Sorry son.

Me: Don't worry Mam, as long as you're alright.

It was nice to be home, though. Sat on the floor, in the front room, with a plate on my knee, in semi dark watching a fuzzy t.v. (no t.v. point in the front room), with the smell of damp and the constant noise of de-humidifiers.

I'm looking forward to my next visit.

Looking forward to my next trip. Judy tells me the accommodation is motel style, parking is right outside, they pay particular interest to the cleanliness of the showers and is run by a mother and son called Norman!

Posted on: 09-Jun-2008@14:34:41, updated on: 09-Jun-2008@14:34:41.

 

Take Your Time

 

The idea behind our Business Development Weeks is to provide an opportunity to go from being a complete novice to being able to take orders for picture framing in one 7 day block.  In fact we have just completed another highly successful training week with the potential for several new businesses to develop.  Of the seven people starting Business Day 1, 5 stayed for all days, seven completed Business Day 1 & 2 and then we had others joining the group for some of the practical days.

So, it is quite clear that not everybody can organise their time in the same way.  Work, family and other commitments quite naturally influence what you sign up for. Also, some will want to pick up the more specialised practical skills for new framing projects, without needing to find out about the business side. Others of you will have difficulty taking a whole week away from work (and home).

It is up to us to find more flexible ways of letting you access our workshops.  As a result we decided to offer an exciting new way of completing our Business Development training programme without having to book time off work.  It also means that, for the first time ever, we are offering weekends for completing one or two of the "development level" courses:  3D Framing; Conversation Framing; Framing Fabric.

Have a look at the full listing below.  We hope this will give you a chance to try something different: make sure you book up quickly to avoid disappointment.

  • Basics of Framing : 28th June           
  • Mount Cutting & Decoration: 29th June
  • Business Day 1 (Getting Organised): 5th July           
  • 3D (box) Framing: 6th July
  • Conservation Framing: 12th July
  • Framing Fabric: 13th July
  • Business Day 2 ( Generating Business): 19th July

View the full programme by clicking BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT WEEK.  You will be able to find details about individual sessions and the full programme.  Links from there will allow you to book places.

Alternatively contact us on 0800 801061 0r email info@diyframing.com

Posted on: 05-May-2008@08:49:31, updated on: 05-May-2008@10:03:30.

 

Framing Sports Shirts

The first time we ventured into a specialist framing field was a great success.  Anybody who frames for other people will know that at some point or another you will be asked to frame a sports shirt.   When you look at them in galleries, you wonder how hard can it really be?  Well, on 17th April 8 intrepid framers took up the challenge. 

 

Part of the problem was the scale of the final piece.  Not all sports personalities are the size of rugby players, but, by the time you have allowed for most of the jersey to be shown with a decorative backing, the frame will still be around 600 mm x 750 mm - bit bigger than A4.  So setting the tables in the training room for 9 of us to work at, each with 3m lengths of moulding, took some planning and ingenuity.  And a quick reorganisation part way through the day.  In the end it was a bit like Strictly Come Framing with the synchronised moves needed, but we all managed to produce good quality frames.

The major difference between what we were doing and 2D framing is the internal depth.  Keeping the shirt well supported and away from the glass is quite a challenge.  The solution we came up with was to create a spacer frame sitting between the mount and the back board.  It does mean taking time to wrestle with a second load of moulding, but is well worth the effort, as it provides added internal strength.  It also makes the final assemble relatively easy.

Whenever you frame a piece of clothing it will need an interior support panel.  They are quite easy to create and prevent sagging between the various attachment points.  The shape needs careful planning so that it doesn't over stretch the garment or push corners through the material.  There are several methods for attaching shirts and support panel onto a backing: specialised tab guns; hanger systems; sewing in - some have even been known to use staples (definitely not advised by DIYframing). 

Sewing was the option used, mainly because this requires more skill and looks the best.  Oh how we enjoyed ourselves for the next 45 minutes! You could have heard a pin drop (in fact several did) the concentration was so great!  The real skill is hiding the stitches, as far as possible, by going through seams or under folds.  You also have to provide enough stretch to get rid of the wrinkles but not so much that it looks like a bad face-lift.  Of course some shirt fabrics are so flimsy that you could actually double the size of the shirt with stretching.

How did they turn out?  Actually, very well indeed.  You really do feel you have completed a bit of top quality framing and the shirts looked really impressive in their frames.  How much would you charge for this type of work?  Expect to pay anywhere upwards of £110.00 for the style of framing used on the day.

In all fairness, we should have called the day a frame a sports shirt day, because the project is quite demanding and really left no time over for more general chat.  Having said that, memorabilia work is usually going to be framing garments, objects or a combination of both.  Our regular 3D framing course covers most the principles behind framing objects that are displayed in a box.  So this gave a chance to look at a different range of challenges.

 

Bob P (now a trading framer trained by DIYframing) had a go at this (Norwich City shirt, no less) and is always good barometer for how a session has gone, was delighted with the day. 

Afterwards he said, "Done them all (courses), I expect you'll think of something else for me to come along to."

If you have any ideas for a specialist day you would like to try, please let us know.  We can't let Bob down.

Posted on: 05-May-2008@09:42:57, updated on: 05-May-2008@10:03:02.

 

Testing Times For Jan Doyle

The ultimate test of your skills as a framer is sitting the Fine Arts Trade Guild, Guild of Commended Framers exam.  Naturally enough it is not an easy level to achieve and will take some practice of skills and experience of working with customers before you may be ready to have a go.  However, as DIYframing is now just turned 5 years old, it is not a surprise that some of our first students are at that point.  What is involved in the assessment and how does it feel to be put through the examination process?  Fortunately we have somebody within the business to tell all.  Jan Doyle, one of our first students and now a trainer with DIYframing, gives you the low down.

 

As for the exam itself well I think it was the most nerve wracking thing I have ever done.  I suddenly realised I hadn't done an exam for over 20 years and it was incredible how those ‘O' Level nerves came back!  The exam is done on a one to one basis and takes just under two hours. 

I had to prepare three framed images to take with me to the test centre.  The first was a piece of art in a double mount, framed to commended level.  The second was a piece framed to conservation level with a set of double lines ruled around the mount (using a ruling pen, no cheating allowed).  The third piece was art on canvas stretched and framed.  The examiner scrutinised then dismantled the framed pieces I had taken with me and quizzed me on how I had done them and why I had chosen the various materials.  She then asked questions to make sure I understood exactly what the different levels of framing are:

  • How and why I would advise customers on the care of their framed work,
  • How I would recognise different forms of artwork and suggest the suitable framing level etc.
  • Why certain materials were used and what they were made of or what treatments they had received during manufacture. 

The next stage was the practical section.  I was handed a piece of paper that had a description of how I should frame an A4 picture.  It turned out to be conservation level, double mount with a weighted bottom boarder.  All materials were provided along with a choice of equipment and I was given 45 minutes to frame the work.  During the task the timer was set and steadily ticked away on the counter . . . .    

Finally there was a multiple choice set paper for which I was allowed about 30 minutes.  During the tasks the timer was set and steadily ticked away on the counter . . . .    I swear I can still hear that clock.

Anyone thinking of taking this exam needs to buy the FATG Commended Framer Study Guide which is very informative and clearly sets out their guidelines and expectations. 

To read her case study click: Jan Doyle

 

Posted on: 05-May-2008@10:01:17, updated on: 05-May-2008@10:01:17.

 

Patchings Art, Craft & Design Festival 2008



As well as the major photography, art and craft shows at major exhibition halls, there are also the more specialised shows taking place at smaller venues. No less important, these will often attract real experts in their respective fields and often have a more informal nature.

One of these is the Patchings Art, Craft and Design Festival in Nottinghamshire. It opens over 5th - 8th June 2008 from 10.00 am - 5.00 pm (Sunday till 4.30 pm).


Quoting from its promotional brochure, the Patchings festival ...

"Offers a rare opportunity to see exquisite pieces of art and craft being created by over 150 exhibitors who will be demonstrating, exhibiting and selling their work. The Festival will be inspirational, instructive and enjoyable. Watch the exhibitors create their work with imagination and expertise from a wide range of raw materials such as clay, stone, metal, wood, precious stones, glass, leather, textile and two dimensional media."

Exhibitors will be working in:

* Painting
* Textiles
* Jewellery
* Metal
* Photography
* Ceramics
* Wood
* Glass Sculpture
* Leather
* Paper
* Precious Metals And
* Stones



This will be our second visit to the festival.  We will have the full range of kit along, with special offers on some products.  It is a great chance to meet up with expert members of DIYframing staff and see a wide range of framing kit being demonstrated.

For full details of the exhibition, download a festival pamphlet (PDF) by visiting: www.patchingsartcentre.co.uk/festival/2008/index.html

Posted on: 04-May-2008@08:53:21, updated on: 04-May-2008@08:53:21.

 

Pack It In

We often have inquiries about complete framing packages:
“I want to start doing my own framing.  What are the best courses to do?” 

That is always a difficult one, because everybody has their own particular idea of what they are likely to be framing.  However, it is possible to draw attention to some groupings we do put together which seem to provide some ideal starts.

The easiest starting point is with one of the “Basics Weekends”.  These are often published as Photography and Art Framing weekends and will get you a point where you could mount and frame almost any type of 2D work in a whole range of styles.  Don’t feel left out if you are a needle crafter, these are for you too, but it may be good to try our Fabric Framing course to complete the picture (another bad pun). These basics weekends are made up of our two entry level courses:
  1. Basics of Framing
  2. Mount Cutting & Decoration

Another package extends into framed canvases, which is becoming increasingly popular with images being so easily printed onto canvas.  You can pick up the canvas stretching & framing day after completing the basics workshops, or you can look for our “Ultimate Framing Weekend" package which is a 3 day course:
  1. Basics of Framing
  2. Mount Cutting & Decoration
  3. Stretching & Framing Canvas Based Artwork.

The final of our “Start Up” deals is the “Totally Ultimate Framing Weekend”.  This starts with the 3 workshops already described and adds a final day exploring how to add bespoke finishes to framing: Adding Decorative Finishes To Frames.

So while there is no single answer, we have tried to provide a range of logical combinations and progressions to help you get going.  Depending how much time you can spend in one block, you could be framing quicker than you might think.

Of course you could always pick and mix the days that you want.

Next chances to do Canvas Framing and / or Frame Finishes are: (click for details)

Manchester: Totally Ultimate Framing Weekend, 9th – 12th May
Beaconsfield: Ultimate Framing Weekend, 17th – 19th May
Beaconsfield: Basically Creative Framing, 21st – 22nd June (day two is Adding Decorative Finishes)
Nuneaton: Totally Ultimate Framing Weekend, 29th August – 1st September
Exeter: Ultimate Framing Weekend, 26th – 28th September

 

Posted on: 04-Apr-2008@11:09:00, updated on: 04-Apr-2008@11:09:00.

 

Cutting Sensation

Onyx 90 professional sheet materials cutter, brand new item

The Onyx 90 is the revolutionary new media cutter from the USA. This amazing new anodized aluminum and stainless steel cutter cuts and sizes mount board, foam board, glass, plastic and more.

Diyframing’s CEO Duncan McDonald who sourced the cutter during a trip to the West Coast Art & Frame Show in Las Vegas says,

“ We have been looking to supply a really good quality cutter at the right price for a long time and this one definitely fits the bill”

With 3 interchangeable heads that are the easiest to change in the industry, changing from one board type to another is now so much easier.

The 60” vertical cutter will handle media up to 16mm (5/8”) thick, it has a built in clamp and calibrated production stops in both inches and millimeters. It also comes with many extra blades and cutting wheels. Additional extras include a five legged collapsible stand which will allow use of the cutter without it being attached to a wall.


Duncan says “I am convinced this superb tool will be a success as it ticks all the boxes for quality, cost and flexibility”

The Onyx 90 has been engineered to last a lifetime and comes with a 5 year warranty, Diyframing is supporting the cutter in the UK offering spare parts, blades and servicing.

For more or to order »

Posted on: 04-Apr-2008@10:57:56, updated on: 04-Apr-2008@10:57:56.

 

Thanks For Focus

For those of you visiting the Focus on Imaging Exhibition at the NEC, you will have noticed just how busy it was.  It was a really good few days for us at DIYframing too.  We had a great time, meeting so many of you: some familiar faces and some who happened across us for the first time. In all cases, we would like to thank you for your interest and continued support. 

We always like to think that everybody in DIYframing works well to give you confident, friendly and practical support.  The response at Focus really does emphasise just how well that relationship works out.  For some this will be the first newsletter received from DIYframing.

When we see so many people, absolutely passionate about their photography, it comes as no surprise to know that there is a massive desire to give your own work a perfect finish.  Our Photography & Art Framing Weekends remain the ideal chance to get those practical framing skills, first hand.  Now you have seen what we can do to help you get started and support you in the future, it is important to act on the impulse!

Our courses will be operating all around the country.  As well as the regular venues:
•    Beaconsfield (almost fortnightly)
•    Manchester
•    Nuneaton (west midlands)
•    Glasgow …. Have a look through the rest of the list: you may be surprised where we end up.

•    Belfast
•    Brighton
•    Cambridge
•    Cheltenham
•    Colchester
•    Exeter
•    Maidstone 
•    Newcastle Upon Tyne
•    Norwich
•    Nottingham
•    Salisbury 
•    Southampton
•    Truro 
•    York

You will need to book in advance as places can go very quickly, especially in the areas where we only visit annually.   If you are part of a Camera Club, Photographic Group or a less formal gathering, we would love to hear from you.  We are happy to arrange to talk to groups at meetings or arrange training days to suit.  All we need is a group of you (about 8) and enough warning to fit it into our current schedule.  Discounts may be possible on request.

February may be late for new years’ resolutions, but it’s never too late to make a new start.  We look forward to meeting up with many of you through the rest of the year at courses and exhibitions.

Visit our Training Zone (click) to find the ideal course for you.

 

Posted on: 03-Mar-2008@08:20:48, updated on: 03-Mar-2008@09:18:36.

 

Basically, Creative Framing

In amongst all of the other things we are up to, we have been putting a full list of training dates on line, taking you up to Christmas.  There are some who may be missing out on getting started with framing, simply because we don’t quite have the training package you are after.

However, we have now come up with some interesting combinations (a very old double entendre from the pre-Carry On era).  In a Featured Framing category, we have linked the Basics of Framing day with some of our specialist courses, so that, over a weekend, you can get started with framing to suit your particular interest.  The content has also been adjusted to take account of the fact that some taking part will be complete novices.

 

The titles to watch out for are: (click title for more)


Of course, you can do this for yourself at other times by signing up for the particular titles you want from the general list: they just won’t be on following days or over one weekend.  A perfect example would be to have a go at Basics of Framing followed by the Framing Memorabilia special on April 17th, Beaconsfield.


These specials could also serve as a perfect refresher weekend.  If you have not yet started framing after one of our training weekends and could do with a confidence-building re-run, these sessions let you practice the basic principles again, while learning a new set of skills.

Posted on: 03-Mar-2008@08:49:26, updated on: 03-Mar-2008@09:18:16.

 

Past News Items

To view past news features, simply visit our news archive by clicking: News Archive.

 

To see last month's features click on titles listed below:

 

past features and news items about framing

 

Posted on: 03-Mar-2008@09:17:22, updated on: 03-Mar-2008@09:17:22.

 
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